Overcoming Failure

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If I could share 500 words to inspire, this is the important wisdom I'd want to pass along to others...

  • If you have ever hit a wall of failure at top speed, you know the paralyzing feeling that takes place inside your body.

    That paralyzing feeling stops you in your tracks, turns a great thing into your worst nightmare. If you have ever poured your heart and soul into something and somehow, someway, it failed, you know what it feels like.

    This feeling of defeat can lead you down two roads. One is the road to nowhere. This road is the road that keeps you from getting out of bed in the morning, changes your beliefs about yourself, changes the beliefs you have about others, and sends you into a spiral of depression.

    The second road is the road that leads you from a feeling of defeat to a feeling of triumph. This is the road less traveled, the road to understanding that you and you alone can overcome any failure. If you choose to!

    This road is the hardest road to walk. It means being triumphant over your thoughts of total defeat. It means changing those crippling thoughts that always seem to pop into your head when you lie in bed at night, drive to work or have a quiet moment alone.

    To overcome these feelings, we need to dig deeper than we have ever dug into our hearts and soul. We have to understand and believe that this defeat was for a reason, but what reason? Did you learn something in your journey? Did you meet interesting people? Did you become a stronger person? Or did you force feed yourself the needed knowledge on how to do it a different way?

    Try to stay focused on what you learned in the process. If the journey to reaching a goal is the big prize, the greatest feeling, then the journey to failure should be looked at the same way, no? Any defeat you meet is simply temporary if you keep striving toward your success – whatever your definition of success is.

    You’ve heard this before, I’m sure. Everyone has heard it from the likes of Edison, Earl Nightingale, and Steve Jobs, but knowing that successful people say it doesn’t stop that crippling feeling from hitting you like a train, does it? You think, “Well it’s easy for them to say.” Just remember, it is easy for them to say, but it was just as difficult for them to overcome the feelings as it will be for you.

    It is not an easy thing to do but you NEED to do it or else you risk the chance that these feelings of failure will destroy your vision, purpose, and goals. Whatever it is that you are fighting for, the people you are trying to help need you to succeed so you can help them.

    Believe in yourself, your dream, your vision, and most of all seize the WOO, that window of opportunity, that only temporary defeat can bring. It’s called growth!

    Dan Deigan

    Dan Deigan serves as an inspiration to others. His energy, passion, and “laugh” are infectious. He is a devoted husband, father, and the co-founder of Little Conversations Today. Dan grew up in Lachine, Quebec. At the age of eleven, his family relocated to Pointe Claire Quebec a suburb of Montreal. Dan was not a confident young man, he was insecure and afraid so he looked to the rough crowd to cloud his fears and insecurities, but all this did as find him trouble with law enforcement. These battles lasted until the day his Dad handed him a copy of Dr. Norman Vincent Peal’s book (The Power Of Positive Thinking). The concepts in Dr. Peal’s book as well as the intensive work he found himself drawn to by the worlds top personal development speakers like Brian Biro, Ed Foreman, Zig Zigler, Bob Proctor, Dale Carnegie, and Wallace Waddles led Dan to co-found Little Conversations Today with his wife Christine. Prior to Little Conversations, Dan was a successful sales person in the expansive world of transportation. He lives in Ontario, Canada with his wife Christine, son Brendan, daughter Jessica, and their dog Blue. Dan is devoted to making not only a shift, but a dynamic shift in the world today.

    For more information, please visit littleconversationstoday.com.

    View all posts by Dan Deigan.

    3 replies
    1. Halee
      Halee says:

      I’m now in recovery from emotional and financial loss as a result of an online romance scam. The pain is multi -dimensional as I have also grown emotionally attached to my scammer. It’s not much different from Stockholm Syndrome actually. But perhaps worse because the “reality” that one thought they were experiencing on many levels was in fact a lie.
      It will take time to heal this one but it will not stop me from believing that the world is still a good place. However, it has taught me that nothing should be blindly trusted. Trust should be earned.
      This piece is indeed timely for my healing.

      Reply

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