Bob Dixon

Bob Dixon entered the United States Air Force in 1970 at age 18. When he left it in 1978, he spent the next 14 years in night school to earn his Associate's and Bachelor's degrees. Along the way, he worked for Honeywell and other major corporations as an employee or consultant in supply chain management, global sourcing, and quality.

In December 2010, Bob founded The Military Civilian Career Coaching Connection (MC4), a LinkedIn group that partners pro-bono coaches and mentors with U.S. military service men and women to help them successfully transition into civilian careers.

He's been featured on numerous national media outlets and has been a guest speaker at such venues as Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Georgia Tech University, Worcester Poly Technical Institute, Rutgers University, Drew University, and some of the largest corporations in Israel, Japan, the U.S., and China.

Currently, Bob lives with his wife in New Hampshire. On weekends, you're likely to find him on a John Deere tractor--or golfing.

For more information, please visit bobdixonbooks.com.

Recent Releases

Entries by Bob Dixon

Children, Breakfast, and a Lesson for Adults

Not long ago I was in Seoul South Korea having breakfast in the restaurant of the Westin Chosen Hotel. You can order off a menu or go to the various cooking stations and chefs in tall – crisp-white chef’s hats will cook eggs or other foods to order. But this is not about the food, but the children from various countries who were there having breakfast with their parents. The children would go with their parents and stare at amazement at the guy with the tall white hat on his / her head – they were in awe. It did not… Read more.

Today’s Brilliance from Bob Dixon

I am an American who is fortunate to have had jobs that allowed me to travel to different countries. Over the past 30 years I’ve been in more than 35 countries in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. During many of those trips I was able to talk with hundreds if not thousands of people in those countries who represented different parts of the culture, community and workforce, such as company CEO’s, and other executives, managers, engineers, production workers, hotel employees, taxi drivers, waiters and waitresses and others. Many of them were also parents. From all of those conversations, I… Read more.