Birthdays and Bone Density – How One Should Remind Us of the Other

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  • By Michele Howe.

    Making the most of every birthday (every day)…aging strong (and healthy.)

    I love birthdays…my own and everyone else’s!

    Call it a hangover from childhood memories and those early traditions…but birthdays are the single one day of the whole year when it’s just fun to pick what you where you want to go (sitting on a warm beach) and what you want to do (sitting on a warm beach with a great book and playing my favorite music) and what you want to eat (sitting on a warm beach with a great book and playing my favorite music while enjoying iced tea + pizza + dark chocolate) …so when I’m trying to decide to how “help” a friend celebrate their special day…I try to tailor their wants and needs and match it to them specifically (and their age)!

    In a similar way, every birthday we pass should cue us into thinking about our health…in particular, our bone health. Often, we give very little thought to proactively caring for this aspect of our bodies…but we should.

    If you’ve ever wondered what “bone density” means as you age, here’s your answer.

    At every decade of life, specific changes are occurring. Below, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Christopher A. Foetisch explains this aging process and how to keep your bones at their strongest density ever.

    TWENTIES:  As we age, bodies go through a gradual process of breakdown. In the early twenties, bone density is at its greatest. From that point forward, bone density begins to gradually decline. Therefore, women want to start at the point with the greatest bone density, so that when the breakdown process begins they have a higher starting point from which to decline.

    THIRTIES:  This means that in the thirties, it is vital to consume the proper amount of calcium and vitamin D. Also, weight-bearing exercises are important to stimulate the formation of strong, dense bones. At this age, the most common injuries are traumatic in nature.

    FORTIES:  Bone loss now begins to increase at a faster pace. If there is a strong family history of bone related issues, it is important to make one’s primary care physician aware of this fact. Exercise and calcium with vitamin D become even more important. Again, any bone injuries tend to be traumatic in nature.

    FIFTIES:  In the fifties, osteoporosis can become a real issue. If you have not done a good job of maintaining good bone density, osteoporosis related fractures can begin to occur. Typically, the type of injuries seen are that of wrist and ankle fractures. A bone density scan should be considered at this time.

    SIXTIES and SEVENTIES:  Here, osteoporosis related problems begin to significantly increase. This is commonly seen in the form of hip, pelvic and spinal fractures. More aggressive medical treatment such as medication to reduce bone loss should be considered at this time. A follow-up bone density scan should be performed at this point.

    Michele Howe

    Michele Howe is a reviewer for Publishers Weekly, FaithfulReader.com, Retailers + Resources, Foreword Magazine, TeenReads.com, KidReads.com, among many others national and international publications. She has published over 2500 reviews/articles and has been featured on numerous radio shows across the country speaking on topics such as parenting and a diverse range of women's health issues. Her work has been published in MORE, FIRST for Women, Good Housekeeping, Christianity Today, Discipleship Journal, Midwest Living, Parentlife, Fullfill, Christian Single, Single Parent Family, Focus on the Family, PRISM, and Connections. She also does manuscript reviewing for several publishing houses including New Growth Press.

    Michele is the author of eighteen books for women. Her first book, "Going It Alone: Meeting the Challenges of Being a Single Mom" (Hendrickson Publishers), provided hope and practical helps for single moms new to parenting solo. She has also authored "Pilgrim Prayers for Single Mothers" (Pilgrim Press) and a third book of helps for single mothers titled, "Successful Single Moms" (Pilgrim Press.) In addition to these resources for single mothers, Michele wrote four separate titles combining real life stories with inspirational prayer retreats. These titles published by (Jossey-Bass) include: "Prayers for Homeschooling Moms," "Prayers to Nourish a Woman's Heart," "Prayers of Comfort and Strength" and "Prayers for New and Expecting Moms."

    Her more recent books include a follow-up resource to "Going It Alone" titled, "Still Going It Alone: Mothering with Faith and Finesse Once the Children Have Grown" (Hendrickson Publishers) and "Burdens Do a Body Good: Meeting Life's Challenges with Strength and Soul" co-authored with orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Christopher A. Foetisch (Hendrickson Publishers).

    One Size Fits All: Making Meaningful Choices, Stepping Into a Meaningful Life was released in early 2013 by Lighthouse of the Carolinas. Burden Lifters: Every Woman's Every Day Resource Kit for a Healthy, Happy Life was released by Bondfire Books in late 2013 and ACTA Publications released, "Faith, Friends, and Other Floatation Devices" which is a compilation of stories, quotes, and practical lifestyle recommendations for "staying afloat" during life's toughest times. Her newest book, Empty Nest, What's Next? Parenting Adult Children Without Losing Your Mind was published fall of 2015. In the fall of 2016, "Caring for Aging Parents: Lessons in Love, Loss, and Letting Go" was released by Hendrickson Publishers. Summer of 2017, her sequel to Empty Nest, What's Next? will be published, Preparing, Adjusting, and Loving the Empty Nest. Read more of Michele's work at michelehowe.wordpress.com and contact Michele at: michelehowewrites@gmail.com.

    For more information, please visit michelehowe.wordpress.com.

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